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Research

tHE DEPARTMENT HAS AN ACTIVE RESEARCH PROGRAMME INVOLVING BOTH ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH STAFF with a focus on THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH AREAS:

  • PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGIES
  • ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
  • ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING
  • ASTRONOMICAL INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ANALYSIS

The department includes the centre for applied photonics and process annalysis (cappa) based in the create building on the cit campus and at the tyndall Nationall institute lee maltings complex. 

CAPPA

Innovation for Industry – CAPPA provides photonics solutions to companies in sectors such as photonics, medical devices, food and pharma, on scales from short-term consultancy to multi-year collaborative projects. This is primarily driven through the Enterprise Ireland-funded CAPPA Technology Gateway.

 

 

The activities of CAPPA have two main foci:

  • Innovation for Industry – CAPPA provides photonics solutions to companies in sectors such as photonics, medical devices, food and pharma, on scales from short-term consultancy to multi-year collaborative projects. This is primarily driven through the Enterprise Ireland-funded CAPPA Technology Gateway.
  • Advanced Research – CAPPA conducts internationally-recognised academic research on topics such as the non-linear dynamics of lasers and ultrafast laser physics, and the understanding of the dynamics of novel semiconductor materials and devices. This is supported by grants from agencies such as SFI, HEA and the EU.

Anaytical Chemistry Group

The department has a long-established analytical chemistry research group led by Dr Ambrose Furey, with extensive experience and capabilty in the areas of elemental and toxicology analysis using techniques such as seperation chromatography and mass spectrometry. The equipment suite includes HPLC (Ion-trap, ICP) and gas chromatography equipment with particular expertise in the area of trace element analysis. The group has over 10 years experience in winning research funding from national and international funding bodies with over 80 peer reviewed publications.

       

Astronomical Instrumentation and Data Analysis

Gamma-ray group: VERITAS collaboration

The gamma-ray group in Cork Institute of Technology is part of the VERITAS Gamma-ray collaboration and has participated in its predecessor the Whipple Observatory collaboration at the Smithsonian Institution’s Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory near Tucson Arizona.

This Whipple Observatory collaboration discovered the Imaging Cherenkov technique in 1988; a technique which has been universally adopted by VHE (Very High Energy) gamma ray astronomy groups worldwide.  VERITAS (The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) is a collection of four telescopes which uses this technique to detect astrophysical sources of VHE gamma rays.  These telescopes have a wide range in sensitivity in the VHE energy band with maximum sensitivity from 100 Gev to 10 TeV.  It is operated by 100 scientists in 22 different institutions spread across the US, Canada, Ireland and Germany. VERITAS is a multi-million euro experiment and is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and up to recently Science Foundation Ireland (through the Research Frontiers Programme).

 

Gamma-ray astrophysics observes the cosmos at the highest energies offering views of the most extreme environments such as relativistic jets emerging from accretion disks near black holes powering the nuclei of active galaxies, neutron-star powered supernova remnants (plerions) and the remnant shock waves from supernova thought to be the origin of galactic cosmic rays.  Noteworthy detections by the VERITAS group include the discovery of gamma rays from the M81 galaxy and pulsed gamma ray emission from the Crab Nebula pulsar. It is a very active collaboration with 39 publications in peer-reviewed journals between 2012 and 2015. The CIT gamma ray group has the primary role of atmospheric quality monitoring through the use of infrared radiometers and LIDAR as well as participating in the operation and maintenance of the VERITAS array of telescopes.

Blackrock castle observatory

Our research staff work with the Blackrock Castle Observatory based near Cork harbour port. 

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